robert williams
robert williams answered

    Even before this play has begun, we are told, by Chorus, of the two "star crossed lovers", who take their life! Therefore, Chorus is already preparing you for death!
    Chorus tell us of the warring faction between Montague and Capulet, by stating the, "ancient grudge", (which is never explained), and broodingly … Read more

robert williams
robert williams answered

  In several Shakespeare plays,  characters like Benvolio are ever present. If anything, they embody the earnest, trying to be helpful "hanger on", that often gets in the way of the plot. However, if they were NOT there, then the plays would not move as sweetly as they do, for Benvolio, et al, makes up … Read more

robert williams
robert williams answered

  The play highlights the warring factions in England at the time of the Cousin's War, what history now calls, The Wars of the Roses.
  Both Montague and Capulet can be seen to represent either the House of York, or of Lancaster,, Henry V1 or Richard 111. Romeo and Juliet as the confused English … Read more

robert williams
robert williams answered

  Shakespeare never visited Venice! If he had, then the canals and the gondolas would most certainly have been mentioned in the two plays he writes about the city. The Merchant of Venice, and Othello the Moor of Venice. However, only briefly, in one line, are gondolas mentioned.

robert williams
robert williams answered

  During his time at school, he would have mainly been taught Latin. Other subjects, such as Greek, were to come later. In the senior years, he, and his contemporaries, were forbidden to speak English, and had to converse in Latin. A 'smidgen' of this occurs in King John, were Constance says "Grief fills the … Read more

robert williams
robert williams answered

    Elizabeth Tudor was 25 when she was crowned in 1588.  Six years later, Shakespeare was born, which made Elizabeth 31, and an old woman!  Why? Anyone over the age of 30 in London then, was considered old!  Bubonic plague was a killer, and it, and its two mutations, Pneumonic plague and Septicaemic plague, … Read more

robert williams
robert williams answered Arpita Mandal's question

  William Shakespeare, was born in 1564. That is fact. The exact date though, is quite something else!

  Stratfordians will tell you, at the drop of a hat, that he was born on the 23 of April!  Why, well because in Shakespeare's day, a baby was christened usually two days after birth, so, had … Read more

robert williams
robert williams answered

    It is, perhaps, Banquo that first suspects Macbeth!  At the start of Act 3 scene 1, Banquo is awaiting Macbeth, who is to give a feast that night, and, whilst waiting, reflects on Macbeth's fortune; "Thou hast it now: King, Cawdor, Glamis, all as the weird women promised ; and I fear thou … Read more

robert williams
robert williams answered

  Othello is, oddly, not geographically sound! Roderigo goes to Brabanzio, the father of Desdemona, to tell him that his daughter has just married the General of the army Othello, who is black! A very annoyed Brabanzio complains to the Duke of Venice. Meanwhile, Othello, Desdemona and an army company, travel down the Adriatic, around … Read more

robert williams
robert williams answered

  There are only two women's parts in this play, which has over forty written parts, for men!  Therefore, you could be forgiven for thinking
the play misoginistic! However, both Calpurnia, (wife of Caesar), and Portia, (wife of Brutus), state commendable philosophy in the play, although short lived. Shakespeare uses Portias words as examples of pure … Read more