Walter The Grump
Walter The Grump thanked The Z.'s answer

I think it depends on what qualities you feel constitute being human. Obviously evildoers are human in the biological sense, but lack humanity in the psychological sense.

There is no denying that humans are capable of evil, we see it by every description every day; but in cases of the most heinous evils, critical aspects … Read more

Walter The Grump
Walter The Grump thanked Pepper pot's answer

No, I think when they say that it means they are a monster, ie not human. People think about things from a personal perspective, and their are just some crimes that are so horrendous no person of right mind, or normal character (love and empathy and good conscience) could commit, hence non human.

Walter The Grump
Walter The Grump commented on Didge Doo's answer
My oh my...whenever I had hospital duty I was armed with a revolver and the inmate always had restraints. We weren't allowed to have computers, books, magazines, our phones, etcetera. We were strictly there to make sure the inmate didn't escape and to notify the captain if the inmate died, went in for surgery, transferred … Read more
Walter The Grump
Walter The Grump commented
I'm glad I did. There are exceptions of course. From what I saw 99% of them used to for their benefit--gang meetings, out of their cells, grabbing their contraband, planning things, etcetera. I can't even count how many times they returned from a religious call-out and immediately reverted back to their thug behaviors. This is … Read more
Walter The Grump
Walter The Grump thanked Didge Doo's answer

Despair, I should think, Otis.

Religion is also used as a ploy by some to persuade parole boards that they were safe to let out into society.

David Berkowitz (Son of Sam) who "found God" in prison and now helps out with chapel services and counselling has applied for parole 15 times without success. He continues … Read more

Walter The Grump
Walter The Grump answered Otis Campbell's question

Here's a viewpoint from a former correctional officer. Going to religious "call-outs"(as we called them) is time out of their cells. It's more time to meet and converse with friends and/or fellow gang members. At one time it looked great when an inmate "found God" and became a Christian when up for parole. Some states … Read more

Walter The Grump
Walter The Grump thanked Pepper pot's answer

Often it due to the Chaplin. The Chaplin is a person that prisoners can talk to in confidence. This may lead to a want of turning their life around or being forgiven.  I also know members of Alcoholics and Narcotics Anonymous go into prisons, and their programme is based on a belief in a higher … Read more