Mark Mottian
Mark Mottian answered August Lavender's question
The following divisibility rules may be important for the nature of such a problem. For divisibility by 2, the units digit of the number should end in either 0; 2; 4; 6 or 8.For divisibility by 3, the sum of the digits of the number should be divisible by 3.For divisibility by 5, the units … Read more
Mark Mottian
Mark Mottian answered Dante Simmons' question
Let "x" represent the number:6x + 10 = 4x - 4  (ten increased by six times a number equals four less than 4 times the number)6x - 4x + 10 - 10 = 4x - 4x - 4 - 10    (subtract 4x and 10 from both sides)2x = -14    (collect terms)2x/2 = -14/2  … Read more
Mark Mottian
Mark Mottian answered Burgon Shuler's question
P = (number of favourable outcomes) / (total number of outcomes)Total number of outcomes  = 2 Nickels + 3 Pennies + 3 Quarters + 2  Dimes = 10 CoinsWe are interested in the probability of selecting dime = 2/10 = 1/5
Mark Mottian
Mark Mottian voted up Oddman's answer
Pick's theorem gives a method of calculating the area of a polygon drawn on a uniform grid. It seems to require the vertices of the polygon be grid points. It can be used to approximate the area of a circle to the extent that the circle can be approximated by a polygon … Read more
Mark Mottian
Mark Mottian voted up Michelle Barber's answer
This is a really great question, but I'm afraid it doesn't have a precise answer. There are a million-and-one diets out there, and there isn't a specific one that works for everyone. Finding the right diet for you is the key to getting in shape - so I'd recommend trying the ones that sound most … Read more
Mark Mottian
Mark Mottian voted up Oddman's answer
In order to make a number greater than 500, the first digit drawn must be 5, 6, or 7. That is, it must be one of three specific digits. The next number drawn will be any of the 6 remaining cards, and the final number drawn will be any of the 5 remaining cards. In … Read more